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Fragmented Yew - Conclusion

Fragmented Yew in Churchyards The Process of Fragmentation Fragmentation Creating 2 Trees
Interpretation of Irregular Fragments Yews on Mounds Conclusion

Conclusion

In this paper I have shown but a few examples of the extraordinary variety of fragmented yews. It should serve as a reminder of the yew’s ability to survive and regrow following a powerful shock, such as the collapse of its crown, the loss of a major limb or a lightning strike. It seems that the only trauma a yew is incapable of withstanding is that inflicted by man - see article “Pollarded to Death” by Toby Hindson or visit the “Lost Yews” page.

Although fragmentation usually signifies an ancient tree it does not signify a tree that is past its prime or nearing the end of its life; fragmentation should be considered a normal part of the yew’s life cycle.

We have to thank our forebears for not destroying their yews when they looked ‘shattered, broken, split, damaged, ruined, wrecked or decayed’. They probably knew more than we do of the yew’s ability to regenerate into great trees like that at Ashbrittle.

It is now our turn to allow the more recently fragmented yews to become great trees for future generations to appreciate.

© Tim Hills 2007

Fragmented Yew in Churchyards The Process of Fragmentation Fragmentation Creating 2 Trees
Interpretation of Irregular Fragments Yews on Mounds Conclusion