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Keeping a Path Clear

Introduction Propping Whole Trees Keeping a Clear Path
Carrying the Canopy Overhead A Single Support Candidates for Future Propping?

On occasions when it becomes necessary to carry a tree’s lower branches across a path, a single prop may suffice.

Newton Valence Yew, Hampshire – 1998 © Tim Hills
Newton Valence Yew, Hampshire – 1998 © Tim Hills

The ancient fragment of yew at Astbury leans at such an angle that in addition to propping, the path appears to have been widened. 

Astbury Yew, Cheshire – 1999 © Tim Hills
Astbury Yew, Cheshire – 1999 © Tim Hills

As long ago as 1834 the churchyard at Overton-on-Dee was “remarkable for the great number of yew trees of extraordinary growth with which it abounds” (Lewis’s Topographical Dictionary of Wales). Its 23 yews have earned it the more recent title of one of the ‘Seven wonders of Wales’. Its oldest yew, consisting of two fragments, has since been enclosed within a fence. Propping also keeps the path clear at Ruyton-XI-Towns in Shropshire and South Hayling in Hampshire, without necessitating the removal of branches.

Overton Yew, Wrexham - 1999 © Tim Hills
Overton Yew, Wrexham - 1999 © Tim Hills
Ruyton Yew - 1999 © Tim Hills
Ruyton Yew - 1999 © Tim Hills
South Hayling Yew - 1998 © Tim Hills
South Hayling Yew - 1998 © Tim Hills
Introduction Propping Whole Trees Keeping a Clear Path
Carrying the Canopy Overhead A Single Support Candidates for Future Propping?